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Learning Abroad Center
Study & Internships in Rome, Italy

Study & Internships in Rome, Italy — Full Course List

Instructions for the Course Selection Form

Semester Program

Please note the Learning Abroad Center may cancel a course if there is not sufficient enrollment.

Summer Program

Course Planning Links

Courses

Italian Language

Beginning Italian ROME 1001
ROME 1002
Fall, Spring & Summer 5 Credits each

First-year Italian. Develop basic listening, speaking, reading, writing and communicative competence skills. Some cultural readings are included. Prerequisites: Italian 1001 for 1002, no prerequisite for 1001.

Link to Syllabus (pdf)

Intermediate Italian ROME 1003
ROME 1004
Fall, Spring & Summer 5 Credits each

Second-year Italian. Further improve conversation and comprehension proficiency as well as reading and writing skills. Includes grammar review. Prerequisites: Italian 1002 for 1003, Italian 1003 for 1004.

Italian for Design ROME
Spring 1 credit

This 1-credit course will be required of all students in the Design track during spring semester. Students will study grammar and vocabulary, and will integrate an intensive study of basic Italian with an overview of historical influences on contemporary Italian culture through its architecture. This course will serve as an introduction to the city and the language, giving students the basic skills to communicate facilitated through an integrative overview of the design resources throughout the city. 

Area Studies

Made in Italy: The Design and Marketing of an Ideal ROME 3003
Fall, Spring & Summer 3 Credits

This course will provide you with a full understanding of Made in Italy as a brand and lifestyle. The course will revolve around lectures and site visits that contribute to the development of a student group marketing plan.
*This course is equivalent to JOUR4259, (SJMC skills course) 

Approved for the Liberal Education Arts & Humanities core and Global Perspectives theme.

Link to Syllabus (pdf)

Italian Communications: Popes, Politicians and Popular Culture ROME 3004
Fall & Spring 3 Credits

This course begins with an overview of Italian Communications and provides a background of the particular qualities and culture of Italian communications. Political and popular power implications will be explored through two examples: The Vatican and Prime Minister and media mogul Silvio Berlusconi.
*This course is equivalent to JOUR3745 (SJMC context course)  

Approved for the Liberal Education Historical Perspectives core and Global Perspectives theme.

Link to Syllabus (pdf)

 

The History of Art and Design in Italy: From Pompeii to Piranesi ROME 3005
Fall & Spring 3 credits

This course investigates design and technology born in Roman antiquity, that are still coveted in our times, and processes and engineering that are still used by today’s designers. From Pompeii to Piranesi, students will visit numerous sites to witness examples of design work, understand preservation techniques, and see why Roman antiquity continues to inspire today’s “Made in Italy” design throughout the world.

Approved for the Liberal Education Arts & Humanities core and Global Perspectives theme.

Link to Syllabus (pdf)

Community Engagement in Rome: Exploring Social Change in the Eternal City ROME 3006
Fall & Spring 3 Credits

In this core course, you will be provided with a set of frameworks for understanding, analyzing and evaluating the impact of culture, engagement and entrepreneurship in a broad variety of leadership situations. On-site studies include ethnic Rom (gypsy) communities, Mafia Influences and refugee populations in Rome.

This class fulfills the elective requirements for the Leadership Minor.

Approved for the Civic Life & Ethics theme.

Link to Syllabus (pdf)

 

Sustainable Foods of Italy ROME 3008
Fall, Spring & Summer 3 Credits

Students examine themes of population growth, food production, ecology, agriculture and economic systems, global warming, consumer consequences, resources and competition for resources, all from an Italian perspective.

Approved for the Liberal Education Environment theme.

Link to Syllabus (pdf)

Neighborhoods of Modern Rome ROME 3010
Fall & Spring 3 Credits

This course examines the transformation of Rome as a capital city of the Papal States to that of the modern nation of Italy through a series of case studies of neighborhoods planned post-unification. Students address theories of utopia, mechanization, modernity and design; the influence of archaeological excavations conducted in the late-19th century; the effect of industry on city planning; and the relationship between national identity, historical context and the modern movements of art nouveau, regionalism, rationalism and futurism.

Approved for the Liberal Education Historical Perspectives core and Global Perspectives theme.

Link to Syllabus (pdf)

 

Roman Design Studio ROME 3011
Spring 6 Credits

This studio course focuses on an urban site with existing historical structures and natural landscape interface. Design challenge would be to transform and adapt the site, its buildings and outdoor space to the needs of the 21st century green economy while maintaining a strong connection to Italian cultural and design traditions.

Approved for the Liberal Education Arts & Humanities core.

Link to Syllabus (PDF)

Internships in Rome: A Comparative Approach to the Italian Workforce ROME 3013
3 or 6 credits — Fall, Spring
3 or 4 credits - Summer
 

This course explores the world of work in Italy and how students respond to the challenges that they can expect to encounter while interning in Rome. A list of potential internship placement areas can be found here.

Link to Syllabus (pdf)

Optional Workshops

Remapping of a Neighborhood ROME 3192
Fall & Spring 2 Credits

This workshop will use the visible historical layers of Rome as a laboratory and mapmaking as a method to explore the relationship between historical, new and unexpected conditions in the city. Design assignments will focus on observing, recording and uncovering layers of information. We will develop skills for making two-dimensional and three-dimensional diagrams of boundaries between two selected neighborhoods drawn from the iconographic Giambattista Nolli map of Rome.

This workshop will observe such experiences as: water in the city, stone use and textures, urban density, human interactions, street art and graffiti, and architectural symbolism. Students will be asked to discover something hidden and new about the route they are mapping. Through observation and analysis each participant will learn to see layers of information and develop stories to describe their individual mapping experience. In the end students should be able to present new Neighborhood Guide for Prospective Student of Architecture.

This workshop must be taken in conjunction with the Neighborhoods of Modern Rome course. 

Link to Syllabus (PDF)

As if People Mattered: Architectural and Urban Lessons in the Eternal City ROME 3194
Fall & Spring 2 Credits

With a title borrowed from Clare Cooper-Marcus’ book Housing as if People Mattered, this workshop seeks to discover the distinctly architectural aspects of housing as manifested through 2000 years of residential architecture in Rome

Students explore theories of utopia, mechanization, modernity and design; the influence of archaeological excavations conducted in the late-19th century and the effect of industry on city planning in relationship to the anonymous contemporary urban development in the city. Relative to historical neighborhood development we will explore new urban residential development in the city where conversations about the places we live as livable, or safe, or even designed have nearly vanished. 

In comparison to the garden neighborhood of Garbatella, the workers district of Testaccio and even the Facist EUR the message is clear, contemporary housing has become incredibly generic, siteless, and bland. Even more troubling, the size and isolation of the housing stock represents a remarkable mismatch between social and economic trends in household size and makeup over the coming decades.

Students will compare and contrast a historical neighborhood and a contemporary development in Rome and visually document the relationship between identity, historical context and the modern social, economic and cultural challenges of the inhabitants of these new developments.

This workshop must be taken in conjunction with the Neighborhoods of Modern Rome course. 

Link to Syllabus (PDF)

Materials and Design: Integrity and Innovation ROME 3191
Fall & Spring 2 Credits

Based on Made in Italy design case studies this course will teach students how to engage design as a natural yet innovative extension of craft and fabrication. Beginning with basic research about material extraction and manufacturing, students will gain an understanding of specific material properties that can be fostered with “hands on” processes, both historical and technological, as the cornerstone of Made in Italy craftsmanship.  Students will select a contemporary Made in Italy product, identify the base materials, research and document the innovative use of these materials to create packaging design for the product based on the same innovative use of natural and man made materials. Students in this workshop will gain a deeper understanding of the role of precedent, need and innovation in material use while exploring the specifics of material assembly to the integrity of the design product. Final deliverables will include carefully crafted packaging mock-ups for the Made in Italy product.

This workshop must be taken in conjunction with the Made in Italy: The Design and Marketing of an Ideal course.

Link to Syllabus (PDF)

Exploring Identity: Community Design for Marginalized Groups ROME 3193
Spring 2 Credits

This workshop will examine the tenants behind the fields of community design and public interest architecture using the highly contentious temporary Rom (gypsy) camps as an investigative tool. Through a series of ongoing conversation with Rom Camp inhabitants, leaders of community-oriented development organizations, city planners and opposed neighborhood groups, students will explore the issues of racism, marginalization and denial of identity within the Rom Camps. From this students will create knowledge maps and diagrams displaying the interactions of organizations, funders, partners, volunteers, and media's portrayal of the Rome specific issues to illuminate how the challenges as different organizations function and interrelate.

This workshop must be taken in conjunction with the Community Engagement in Rome: Exploring Social Change in the Eternal City course. 

Link to Syllabus (PDF)

Resources

On-Site Guide Program Orientation Visa Information Program Resources

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